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Khalifa bin Zayed al Nahyan died: who will succeed the president of the United Arab Emirates

The president of the United Arab Emirates, Khalifa bin Zayed al Nahyan, died: who will succeed him

The president of the United Arab Emirates died, and his strong younger brother is set to take his place as OPEC’s third-largest oil producer.

Sheikh Khalifa Bin Zayed Al Nahyan had been the UAE’s leader since 2004, guiding the country through the global financial crisis and overseeing its fast economic growth. He was 73 at the time.

Sheikh Khalifa was also the ruler of Abu Dhabi, the United Arab Emirates’ biggest and wealthiest emirate. Crown Prince Sheikh Mohammed Bin Zayed Al Nahyan, his younger brother, is expected to succeed him as president and ruler of Abu Dhabi.

May God has compassion on you, Khalifa bin Zayed, my brother, mentor, and teacher, and bring you to his good favour and heaven, Sheikh Mohammed said on Twitter. It is uncertain who will follow him as Crown Prince of Abu Dhabi.

Due to Sheikh Khalifa’s declining health, MBZ, or Sheikh Mohammed, has been the de facto leader of the UAE for years. The transition is unlikely to result in substantial policy changes, notably in the energy sector.

Sheikh Mohammed already has complete control over the country’s energy strategy and oil riches, which is believed to be 6% of global reserves. Long before his brother’s murder, the crown prince was chairman of the UAE national oil firm and the Supreme Council for Financial and Economic Affairs in Abu Dhabi, making him the most powerful man in the kingdom.

Little has changed in terms of functionality; MBZ has been in charge practically since the beginning, according to Ryan Bohl, Middle East analyst at Stratfor Worldview. However, the UAE is coming to the end of an era characterised by a second gold rush in the services and knowledge sectors.

From Saturday, the UAE will observe 40 days of grief and close the public and private sectors for three days.

With his wife, Shamsa bint Suhail Al Mazrouei, he had eight children: two sons and six girls. There were multiple grandkids for the pair.

When the global financial crisis struck Dubai in 2009, Sheikh Khalifa invested billions of dollars to save the glitzy emirate, which was still constructing the world’s highest tower at the time. The tower was dubbed Burj Khalifa in his honour.

Since 2004, MBZ has served as Crown Prince, and he is set to formally resume the duties he has held for years, helping to enhance the UAE’s image as a socially liberal, business-friendly sanctuary in a volatile area while retaining a tight grip on dissent. and installs high-tech monitoring around the country.

Under MBZ’s leadership, he rarely conducts interviews and offers few public remarks.

Saudi Arabia, a neighbouring country, is attempting to usurp its economic and political leadership.

The 61-year-old is young for an Arab leader, but he has Washington’s trust and has exploited the UAE’s economic might to establish powerful partnerships from Moscow to Beijing. He has also made the country’s military one of the best equipped and trained in the Middle East as a soldier.

This country of ten million people, situated on one of the world’s main waterways, has adopted an assertive foreign policy under his leadership, focusing on neutralizing all shades of political Islam both inside and beyond the country, particularly after the Arab Spring protests of 2011.

Saudi Arabia, a neighbouring country, is attempting to usurp its economic and political leadership.

The 61-year-old is young for an Arab leader, but he has Washington’s trust and has exploited the UAE’s economic might to establish powerful partnerships from Moscow to Beijing. He has also made the country’s military one of the best equipped and trained in the Middle East as a soldier.

This country of ten million people, situated on one of the world’s main waterways, has adopted an assertive foreign policy under his leadership, focusing on neutralizing all shades of political Islam both inside and beyond the country, particularly after the Arab Spring protests of 2011.

In 2016, the crown prince appointed Sultan Al Jaber, the CEO of the sovereign wealth firm Mubadala Investment, to strengthen his grip over UAE politics and oil production.

Since then, the corporation has sold holdings in major assets, raising more than $20 billion and bringing in new investors. It is investing billions to produce additional oil, with crude output capacity expected to rise by 25% to 5 million barrels per day by 2030.

In addition, the government is growing its natural gas production capacity and plans to export more fuel, all while pledging to minimize its carbon impact. To cut emissions and fulfil its objective of zero emissions by 2050, the UAE is establishing solar and nuclear power facilities, making it the first major Gulf oil producer to do so.

 

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